The Awakening by Kate Chopin | Mini Review

The Awakening by Kate Chopin | Mini ReviewThe Awakening by Kate Chopin
Published by Palgrave Macmillan on May 8, 2000
Genres: Classic
Pages: 364
Format: Paperback
Source: Purchased
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This revision of a widely adopted critical edition presents the 1969 Seyersted text of Kate Chopin's novel along with critical essays that introduce students to "The Awakening" from the perspectives of feminism, new historicism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction and cultural studies. An additional essay demonstrates how various approaches can be combined together. The text and essays are complemented by introductions to "The Awakening" and to the criticism, a glossary of critical terms, and contextual documents.

I had to read this book for my English class, and I honestly didn’t enjoy it that much. For some reason, classic novels are really hit or miss for me, and this one was definitely a miss. I found the book to be written very beautifully, so I did appreciate Chopin’s writing style, though the plot itself was kind of boring and hard for me to get interested in. I honestly found myself most interested in the book at the very end, and then it was over.

Despite that, I did appreciate how much feminism was in this novel, especially with Edna trying to decide what she wants to do with her life with the society that she was in, as well as the time period. I found her to be a fascinating character.

I think this book is worth reading at least once, but it wasn’t one that I will ever reread.

About Kate Chopin

Kate Chopin was an American novelist and short-story writer best known for her startling 1899 novel, The Awakening. Born in St. Louis, she moved to New Orleans after marrying Oscar Chopin in 1870. Less than a decade later Oscar’s cotton business fell on hard times and they moved to his family’s plantation in the Natchitoches Parish of northwestern Louisiana. Oscar died in 1882 and Kate was suddenly a young widow with six children. She turned to writing and published her first poem in 1889. The Awakening, considered Chopin’s masterpiece, was subject to harsh criticism at the time for its frank approach to sexual themes. It was rediscovered in the 1960s and has since become a standard of American literature, appreciated for its sophistication and artistry. Chopin’s short stories of Cajun and Creole life are collected in Bayou Folk (1894) and A Night in Acadie (1897), and include “Desiree’s Baby,” “The Story of an Hour” and “The Storm.”

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