A Tyranny of Petticoats | Review

I received this book for free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

A Tyranny of Petticoats | ReviewA Tyranny of Petticoats by Jessica Spotswood, J. Anderson Coats, Andrea Cremer, Y.S. Lee, Katherine Longshore, Marie Lu, Kekla Magoon, Marissa Meyer, Saundra Mitchell, Beth Revis, Caroline Tung Richmond, Lindsay Smith, Robin Talley, Leslye Walton, Elizabeth E. Wein
Series: A Tyranny of Petticoats #1
Published by Candlewick Press on March 8, 2016
Genres: Historical Fiction
Pages: 354
Format: ARC
Source: Netgalley
Goodreads
Rating:

From an impressive sisterhood of YA writers comes an edge-of-your-seat anthology of historical fiction and fantasy featuring a diverse array of daring heroines.

Criss-cross America — on dogsleds and ships, stagecoaches and trains — from pirate ships off the coast of the Carolinas to the peace, love, and protests of 1960s Chicago.

Join fifteen of today’s most talented writers of young adult literature on a thrill ride through history with American girls charting their own course. They are monsters and mediums, bodyguards and barkeeps, screenwriters and schoolteachers, heiresses and hobos. They're making their own way in often-hostile lands, using every weapon in their arsenals, facing down murderers and marriage proposals. And they all have a story to tell.
With stories by:J. Anderson CoatsAndrea CremerY. S. LeeKatherine LongshoreMarie LuKekla MagoonMarissa MeyerSaundra MitchellBeth RevisCaroline Tung RichmondLindsay SmithJessica SpotswoodRobin TalleyLeslye WaltonElizabeth Wein

To be honest, I’ve not read that many anthologies. The only other ones I’ve read are Press Start to Play and Summer Days and Summer Nights. That’s why I knew that A Tyranny of Petticoats was one that I wanted to check out, especially because I absolutely loved the other anthologies that I’ve read. There’s just something about short stories. I get attached to the characters and then they’re gone forever within twenty pages. There’s just something magical about them.  

Of course I was most excited for the stories by Marissa Meyer, Beth Revis, and Marie Lu. I really liked Meyers and Revis’s. Marie Lu’s story was actually one that I didn’t enjoy all that much. This was sort of a disappointment since her story was right in the beginning. I of course ended up loving some other stories as well, such as Elizabeth Wein’s.

Upon researching A Tyranny of Petticoats a bit on Goodreads, I actually saw that there’s going to be another anthology within the same sort of genre by different authors! I’m definitely going to be checking that out when it finally releases because I definitely enjoyed this one.

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About Andrea Cremer

Andrea Cremer began writing novels after a horse broke her foot. Ten books later, she believes that horse must have been an agent of fate.

Prior to becoming a full-time writer, Cremer resided in the academic world where she was a professor of early modern history. She now splits her time between Minnesota and Southern California, taking her two Havanese, Joss and Maisie, wherever she goes.

About Beth Revis

Beth Revis writes books. She also eats too much chocolate, wishes she could travel more, and prefers puppies to people. Beth lives in rural NC with her boys: one husband, one son, two very large puppies.

About Caroline Tung Richmond

Caroline Tung Richmond is an award-winning young adult author, whose historical novels include The Only Thing to Fear, The Darkest Hour, and Live In Infamy. She’s also the co-editor of the anthology Hungry Hearts, which features stories about food and will come out in June 2019 from Simon Pulse. Her work is represented by Jim McCarthy of Dystel & Goderich.

Caroline is also the Program Director of We Need Diverse Books, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that advocates for diversity in children’s publishing.

After growing up in the Washington, D.C. area Caroline now lives in Virginia with her family.

About Elizabeth E. Wein

Born in New York City in 1964, Elizabeth moved to England when she was three and started school there. Her father Norman Wein, who worked for the New York City Board of Education for most of his life, was sent to England to do teacher training at what is now Manchester Metropolitan University, where he helped organize the Headstart program there. When Elizabeth was six, Norman was sent to the University of the West Indies in Jamaica for three years to do the same thing in Kingston. Elizabeth lived in Jamaica from 1970-1973. She loved Jamaica and as a child was fluent in Jamaican patois. It was in Jamaica that she first started reading, and consequently, first started writing. At the age of seven, she and a friend completed a “book” called The Hidden Treasure as part of a “mystery series” based on the Hardy Boys!

When her parents separated, Elizabeth and her younger brother and sister ended up back in the USA living with their mother Carol Flocken in Harrisburg, PA, where Carol’s parents were. When Carol died in a car accident in 1978, Carol’s parents took the children in and raised them. In the years immediately following her mother’s death, books were Elizabeth’s lifeline, particularly fantasy. Inspired by JRR Tolkien, Alan Garner and Ursula K LeGuin, Elizabeth completed an epic fantasy novel, By Sunlight and Starlight, at 14. In retrospect it was mostly awful, described by one contemporary reader as “the stupidest book I ever read,” but it was very good practice. Elizabeth then discovered King Arthur (through Mary Stewart, TH White and Susan Cooper), and at 15 started work on the characters and storyline which eventually became her first published novel, The Winter Prince.

Elizabeth went to Yale University, spent a work-study year back in England, and then spent seven years getting a PhD in Folklore at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, where she held a Javits Fellowship. While in Philadelphia she learned to ring church bells in the English style known as “change ringing”, and in 1991 she met her future husband there at a bell ringers’ dinner-dance. Tim is English, and in 1995 Elizabeth moved to England with him, and then to Scotland in 2000.

It was Tim’s enthusiasm for small planes that inspired Elizabeth to learn to fly. Tim got his private pilot’s license in 1993 and Elizabeth got hers ten years later. Together they have flown in the States from Kalamazoo to New Hampshire; in Kenya they’ve toured from Nairobi to Malindi, on the coast, and also all over southern England.

Alone, most of Elizabeth’s flying has been in eastern Scotland, where she has now lived for over fifteen years. She wrote all but one of her novels since moving to Scotland. Her early books for young adults are set in Arthurian Britain and sixth century Ethiopia, including the sequence The Mark of Solomon, published in two parts as The Lion Hunter (2007) and The Empty Kingdom (2008). The Lion Hunter was short-listed for the Andre Norton Award for Best Young Adult Fantasy and Science Fiction in 2008.

Achieving her private pilot’s licence inspired Elizabeth to take her more recent novels in a new direction. Code Name Verity and Rose Under Fire are set in World War II and focus on the role of female pilots during the war. Black Dove, White Raven continues the aviation theme but moves the action back to Ethiopia, this time during Mussolini’s 1935 invasion. Code Name Verity and Rose Under Fire received widespread critical acclaim, with Code Name Verity becoming a New York Times Bestseller in young adult fiction.

Elizabeth also writes short stories. She and Tim have two children.

About J. Anderson Coats

J. Anderson Coats is the award-winning author of books for kids of all ages. She’s received two Junior Library Guild awards and earned starred reviews from Kirkus, School Library Journal, the Horn Book Review, and Shelf Awareness. Her newest book is R is for Rebel, middle-grade novel about coercion and resistance in a reform school in a fictional occupied country.

The Wicked and the Just was one of Kirkus Reviews’ Best Teen Books of 2012 and won the Washington State Book Award for Young Adults. She is also the author of The Many Reflections of Miss Jane Deming, a middle-grade novel set in Washington Territory in the 1860s which was a 2017 Junior Library Guild selection and one of Kirkus’s Best Historical Middle-Grade Books of 2017. Her short story, “Mother Carey’s Table,” appeared in A Tyranny of Petticoats: 15 Stories of Belles, Bank Robbers, and Other Badass Girls (Candlewick, 2016).

The Green Children of Woolpit, a historically-inspired middle-grade fantasy, is forthcoming from Atheneum in fall 2019. Spindle and Dagger, a YA novel set in twelfth-century Wales, is forthcoming from Candlewick Press in spring 2020.

About Jessica Spotswood

Jessica Spotswood is the author of the historical fantasy trilogy The Cahill Witch Chronicles and the contemporary novels Wild Swans and The Last Summer of the Garrett Girls. She is the editor of the feminist anthologies A Tyranny of Petticoats: 15 Stories of Belles, Bank Robbers, & Other Badass Girls and The Radical Element: 12 Stories of Daredevils, Debutantes, & Other Dauntless Girls and co-editor of Toil & Trouble: 15 Tales of Women & Witchcraft. Jess lives in Washington, DC, where she works for the DC Public Library as a children’s library associate. She is a feminist, a Hufflepuff, and an INFJ.

About Katherine Longshore

Katherine Longshore grew up on the coast of northern California. She earned a B.A. in Cross-Cultural Studies and Communications from Humboldt State University, planning to travel and write. Forever. Four years, six continents and countless pairs of shoes later, she went to England for two weeks, stayed five years and discovered history. She now lives in California with her husband, two children and a sun-worshiping dog.

About Kekla Magoon

Kekla Magoon is the author of nine novels, including The Rock and the River, How It Went Down, X: A Novel (with Ilyasah Shabazz), and the Robyn Hoodlum Adventure series.

She has received an NAACP Image Award, the John Steptoe New Talent Award, two Coretta Scott King Honors, The Walter Award Honor, the In the Margins Award, and been long listed for the National Book Award. She also writes non-fiction on historical topics.

Kekla conducts school and library visits nationwide and serves on the Writers’ Council for the National Writing Project. Kekla holds a B.A. from Northwestern University and an M.F.A. in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts, where she now serves on faculty.

About Leslye Walton

Leslye Walton was born in the Pacific Northwest. Perhaps because of this, Leslye has developed a strange kinship with the daffodil–she too can only achieve beauty after a long, cold sulk in the rain. Her debut novel, THE STRANGE AND BEAUTIFUL SORROWS OF AVA LAVENDER, was inspired by a particularly long sulk in a particularly cold rainstorm spent pondering the logic, or rather, lack thereof, in love.

Leslye is a full-time writer living in Seattle, Washington. She spends her time eating chocolate cupcakes, and doting on her chihuahuas, Mr. Darcy and Doc Holliday.

About Lindsay Smith

Lindsay is the author of multiple novels for young adults, including Sekret and A Darkly Beating Heart, as well as the comic series Black Swan. She is the showrunner and lead writer for Serial Box’s The Witch Who Came In From the Cold, a Publisher’s Weekly Best Book of 2017. Her short stories and comics have appeared in the anthologies A Tyranny of Petticoats, Strange Romance Vol. 3, and Toil & Trouble and on Tor.com. She lives in Washington, DC with her husband and dog.

About Marie Lu

Marie Lu was born in 1984, in China. She left Beijing for the States in 1989 and went to college at the University of Southern California.

Lu is the author of the New York Times bestselling novels Legend and Prodigy. She graduated from the University of Southern California and jumped into the video game industry, working for Disney Interactive Studios as a Flash artist. Now a full-time writer, she spends her spare time reading, drawing, playing Assassin’s Creed, and getting stuck in traffic. She currently lives in Los Angeles (see above: traffic) with her fiancé, one Chihuahua mix, and two Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

About Marissa Meyer

Marissa Meyer is the #1 New York Times-bestselling author of Heartless and The Lunar Chronicles. She lives in Tacoma, Washington, with her husband and twin daughters. She’s a fan of most things geeky (Sailor Moon, Firefly, any occasion that requires a costume), and has been in love with fairy tales since she was a child. She may or may not be a cyborg.

About Robin Talley

I live in Washington, D.C., with my wife, our baby daughter, an antisocial cat and a goofy hound dog. Whenever the baby’s sleeping, I’m probably busy writing young adult fiction about queer characters, reading books, and having in-depth conversations with friends and family about things like whether Jasmine’s character motivation was sufficiently established in Aladdin.

About Saundra Mitchell

Saundra Mitchell is the author of SHADOWED SUMMER, THE VESPERTINE, THE SPRINGSWEET, THE ELEMENTALS and MISTWALKER. In non-fiction, she’s the author of the THEY DID WHAT!? series for middle grade readers. She’s also the editor of the YA anthology DEFY THE DARK. IN 2018, HarlequinTEEN will publish her next anthology, ALL OUT.

Writing as Jessa Holbrook, she published her first romantic contemporary YA with Razorbill, WHILE YOU’RE AWAY. In summer 2014, she debuted WILD, her first YA novel writing as Alex Mallory.

SHADOWED SUMMER was the 2010 winner of The Society of Midland Authors Book Award for Children’s Fiction and a 2010 Edgar® Award Nominee. It was chosen as a Junior Library Guild selection and an ALAN Pick in 2009.

Her short story “Ready to Wear” was nominated for a 2007 Pushcart Prize after appearing in Vestal Review Issue 27. Her short fiction and non-fiction has appeared in anthologies including A TYRANNY OF PETTICOATS, FORETOLD, GRIM, TRUTH & DARE and DEAR BULLY.

For twenty years, she was the head screenwriter and an executive producer with Dreaming Tree Films on their various teen filmmaking programs, including the largest teen filmmaking program in the United States, Fresh Films. They produced more than four hundred films from her screenplays, and she earned Academy Award eligibility ten times during her tenure.

In other arenas, Ms. Mitchell was interviewed by the New York Times and the BBC for her part in exposing the Kaycee Nicole hoax, and she’s been tapped by morning radio shows all over the United States as a guest expert on Urban Legends & Folklore.

In her free time, she enjoys fandom, studying history, papermaking, and spending time with her wife and her daughters.

About Y.S. Lee

Y S Lee was born in Singapore, raised in Vancouver and Toronto, and lived for a spell in England. As she completed her PhD in Victorian literature and culture, she began to research a story about a girl detective in 1850s London. The result was her debut novel, The Agency: A Spy in the House. This won the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s inaugural John Spray Mystery Award in 2011.

The Agency quartet continues with The Body at the Tower and The Traitor and the Tunnel, both of which were nominated for awards. Ying’s most recent novel, Rivals in the City, is the final book in the Agency series. All four books are published by Candlewick Press (US/Canada) and Walker Books (UK/Australia). The novels have also been translated into French, German, Spanish, Italian, Korean and Turkish.

Comment

3 Comments

  • Jenn Renee
    07.30.2016

    I have not read many anthologies either. They don't usually appeal to me but this one does. I need to read it. so happy to see you enjoyed it.

  • Becky Baker
    07.30.2016

    I'm slowly becoming a fan of anthologies. I like the little stories that they are just fun and easy to read. I've heard of this anthology and it certainly sounds like something I should read. I just need to get my hands on a copy.

  • Lorraine
    07.31.2016

    Such a good cover! I'm glad the stories live up to it ;D

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